Life In Cleveland in the 19th Century: An Intern’s View

Life In Cleveland in the 19th Century: An Intern’s View

Life in Cleveland was much like any big city, due to the industrial revolution new technology, new inventions were sprouting up every month or year from trolleys, automobiles, gramophones, ideals, and everyone looked to the future. The rich in Cleveland who could afford such items so their throughout their life in the 19th century they were a frequent adopter in the process.

In Cleveland there was a definite economic class division due to the booming in the stock market and investors and a gender and racial inequality in the households and in the overall society, which was overturned in the middle and end 19th  of the nineteenth century. If you were lower class like the majority of Americans everyone from parents to children worked in the factories.

A vast majority of Europeans were immigrating into the United States to find opportunity and wealth, so the city of Cleveland at the time was becoming more diverse in nationality, particularly Germans. Towards the end of the century everyone questioned his or her rights as a worker and as a citizen.

In the 19th century Cleveland was a hotspot during the time of transition in America from out of the mud and dark and into the light of revolution economically, culturally, and as a society. But in the 19th century it also must be said that that is the time when we were unknowingly polluted the environment, made toxins that risked health of Americans that we later found out and fixed after so many suffering. There was the progression and revival for arts, entertainment, and education endowed by the wealthy families of Cleveland.

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